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Copyright 1950 by The Cooper Union Museum for the Arts of Decoration 



ALL THAT GLISTERS 

From the earliest periods of recorded history gold has been 
endowed with beauty and value, two qualities which man esteems 
most in his possessions. Craftsmanship displays its greatest attain- 
ments in objects of gold, for gold is a substance that does not lend 
itself to the efforts of the unskilled. Costly ornaments of every age 
are captured in this enduring metal ; the extremes and diversities in 
the passage of history are recorded in goldsmiths' work, and this 
noble craft still flourishes in every section of the globe. 

Aside from its intrinsic merit, gold often has been accepted 
as the material reflection of spiritual quality. The fitments of almost 
all religions have included elements of gold to indicate the worthi- 
ness of an ideal and the degree of a people's devotion to it. Thus 
places of both pagan and Christian worship are frequently char- 
acterized by the brilliance of their displays and the garments and 
fittings of their priests. Secular power, too, has often assumed gold 
as its symbol. Succeeding courts and rulers have been distinguished 
by the richness of their surroundings while lesser folk have followed 
suit as best they might with what enrichments they were able to 
possess. Groups which, on the contrary, consciously disclaim the 
ownership of bright objects find their austerity ennobled by the 
absence of gold things. This common trait of man, love of glitter, 
is apparently constant through all stages of culture and of social 
evolution, exciting the savage no more than it bedazzles the sophis- 
ticated. 

But all that glisters is not gold. Sometimes the admired bril- 
liance comes only from a gold exterior, or from a surface that simu- 
lates gold or another of the precious metals. The artisans of every 
period have had as an immediate problem the production of objects 
which by their resplendent surfaces or textures would give pleasure 
and lend distinction to their owners. Almost every type of accessory 
with which man surrounds himself has seemed at one time or another 



suitable for the display of gold. His garments and personal decora- 
tions, elements of his house or public buildings and the things they 
contain have all been enriched in one way or another with the bril- 
liance which he values so greatly. Walls, ceilings and floors, glass, 
ceramics, wood and metalwork, books, textiles and embroideries 
have all offered their surfaces for this type of embellishment. And 
it has required all the cleverness and skill the artisan could muster 
to develop the techniques and produce the results so constantly de- 
sired by his patron. 

With a subject embracing so many centuries, places, and tech- 
niques, this exhibition makes no pretense of presenting a complete 
survey of the various types of objects which it includes. Rather, 
through a series of groups of objects having fairly uniform quality, 
it hopes to present a continuous section through the development of 
the use of glitter which will serve to illustrate and illuminate the 
general course of its subject. One general restriction has been care- 
fully observed ; in no instance is an object composed entirely or even 
largely of gold. In fact, it is the purpose of the exhibition to show 
that the effect of the sumptuousness of gold has consistently been 
achieved without the use of that metal as the body of the objects or 
as any great fraction of their weight or even with the total exclusion 
of gold from their composition. 

Glass, a versatile substance admired alike for its usefulness 
and its beauty, has been subject to gilding or other means of gold 
enrichment for centuries. Encased gold leaf, the swischengoldglas 
technique, adorned Roman glass and the circular Early Christian 
pieces, probably the bottoms of shallow dishes or bowls, which were 
applied to the walls of the Roman catacombs (number 90). This 
same technique was employed in Egyptian glass of the Fatimid 
period (tenth to twelfth centuries). After the fall of the Fatimid 
dynasty (1171) gilding, as distinct from lustre painting, became com- 
mon on Islamic glass and reached its high point in the thirteenth 
century in Syria. In Europe, the gold-engraved glass devotional 

4 



panels of the fourteenth century in Italy were outstanding though 
they were followed in succeeding centuries by rude panels of some- 
what similar type having no more distinction than is associated with 
peasant art. Simpler verre eglomise panels of the same type and 
period are of equal interest. Gilding was used on Venetian glass of 
the fifteenth century and a hundred years later was occasionally 
the sole decoration. Both fired and cold gilding was used. Notable 
subsequently are the brilliant "powdered" surfaces which are found 
among the elaborate forms of the Venetian glass houses and in 
Spain. Spanish glass of the eighteenth century was frequently gilded 
as it had been for centuries, while such treatment was much more 
rare in England (number 89). The celebrated Waterford glass 
objects were infrequently gilt, the best of the rare pieces decorated in 
gold being done in the 1780's by a man named Grahl. Bristol glass 
was now and then touched with gilding. In the last quarter of the 
eighteenth century in Bohemia, Johann Joseph Mildner developed 
again to a high point, in his doppelwandglas, the encased gold leaf 
technique. The nineteenth century saw gilding employed generally; 
the Bohemian examples are probably the best-known. Gold on early 
American glass is rare. The later pieces so decorated are generally 
of small importance. 

Pottery, though an older material than glass, does not bear 
gilding on its earliest examples though numbers of pieces of Myce- 
naean pottery have been found decorated in gold (number 184). 
As early as the first half of the seventh century B. C. archaic Greek 
statuettes were enriched with gilding. The desire for display 
prompted the production of clever imitation jewelry, which became 
quite common, in gilt terra cotta. Perhaps the best examples of 
Greek pottery decorated in gold are a series of fourth century B. C. 
vases from Capua. Pieces of pottery were sometimes painted yellow 
to simulate gold. An occasional fully gilt Hellenistic piece is ex- 
tremely rich in its effect (number 32). Cold gilding in combination 
with delicate blue and white decoration on pieces of the thirteenth 
century (number Z?>) is a striking Persian technique. 

5 



A craft brought in by the Moors, lustre decoration of pottery 
enjoyed considerable popularity in Spain as early as the fourteenth 
century, and the magnificent Hispano-Moresque wares of Malaga, 
Manises, and other centers about Valencia reached their high point 
in the fifteenth century (numbers 14, 21). The craft has never been 
abandoned though late pieces show a significant degeneration of style 
and generally are of small worth. Wedgwood and others in England 
in the eighteenth century produced lustred pieces of limited interest. 
During the early years of the nineteenth century great numbers of 
lustred jugs and other objects of very little importance were pro- 
duced. Lustering is being employed currently on decorative and 
useful pottery in both traditional and contemporary styles. 

Gilding was promptly applied to newly discovered porcelain 
in Europe in the second quarter of the eighteenth century, and on 
these early pieces the gold chinoiseries of the factory at Meissen 
are outstanding (numbers 9, 10). During the course of the century 
gilding as a technique was adopted eagerly by every porcelain centre 
and has never lost favor. Scaled and diapered grounds, entirely 
gilt and engraved surfaces, gilt baroque and rococo enframements, 
decorative bands and medallions, all find in gold the richness de- 
manded by the taste of many generations. The wares of Chelsea 
in England may be mentioned as examples of the delicacy with which 
gilding was employed. Later, some pieces of the nineteenth century 
such as the great Rockingham vase surmounted by a gilt rhinoceros 
do not appear so fortunate. In the Orient, in concession to the 
"barbarian" taste of western consumers of export porcelain, gild- 
ing occurred notably on Yung-Cheng (1723-1735) and the later 
famille rose porcelains (Ch'ien-Lung, 1736-1795). Modern por- 
celain of every country is often enriched with gold in styles as varied 
as the taste of its purchasers (figure 14). 

Though wood lacks the smooth, impermeable surface common 
to glass and glazed ceramics, methods of giving wooden objects gold 
surfaces were developed early in Egypt, whose gilded woods are 
mentioned by both Pliny (23-79 A. D.) and Herodotus (about 484?- 

6 



425? B. C.)- The magnificent gold-surfaced furniture pieces (about 
1400 B. C.) of the Eighteenth Dynasty, now in the Cairo Museum 
are among the rare examples preserved. Pliny also speaks of Roman 
gilding, noting especially the elaborate gilded Roman ceilings. Medi- 
eval objects of gilded wood are come upon with fair frequency (figure 
4) ; particularly fortunate effects were obtained in the carved wood 
devotional figures of Germany, Spain, and other parts of the Con- 
tinent. The elaborate gilt cassoni of the Italian Renaissance are to 
be found in most major museums along with other gilt wood objects 
of the same period (number 68). Outside the scope of our study and, 
indeed, almost beyond belief are the solid gold and silver Spanish 
furniture pieces of the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. They 
are mentioned along with similar English objects of the seventeenth 
century to indicate the extremes to which the demands for opulence 
could take the furniture craftsman. In England such pieces of 
durable value appear to have been particularly sought after by the 
demanding mistresses of Charles II. They are also important in 
determining the nature of contemporary and subsequent gilded 
pieces of almost equal (though certainly less costly) richness. 

True gesso gilding, which is a more elaborate method of water 
gilding, originated in Italy, going from there to France from which 
country it found its way to England. Though the process may sound 
simple, it actually requires the greatest skill and experience to apply 
and gild a gesso ground successfully. After the rough detail has 
been carved in the wood, the surface of the piece is covered with as 
many as twenty separate coats of a mixture of whiting and size (this 
was true with the superlatively gilded Louis XIV pieces). When 
these have dried and hardened sufficiently, the new smooth surface 
created is treated to the final detailed carving, a task requiring the 
utmost assurance of technique. When the surface is moistened 
with water, gold leaf will adhere to it ; two layers are sometimes used. 
When dry, the surface can be either left dull or burnished where 
required. Varying effects are achieved by the application of sand or 
hatching before the gold leaf is put on. 

7 



Much admired in England, the taste for gilt furniture was first 
fully expressed at the end of the reign of William and Mary. Gilding 
was extensively used in the Palladian houses erected between 1700 
and 1750. The gilded furniture of the reign of George I is often 
of extremely fine quality, pieces designed by such noted men as 
Willian Kent (1685-1748) being frequently surfaced with gold. 
Kent, largely between 1730 and 1745, widely influenced the decora- 
tion of the great houses, executing elaborate commissions for Lord 
Burlington's villa at Chiswick, and for General Dormer, for Lord 
Leicester, and others. In fact in both France and England during 
the entire eighteenth century, as well as in other European countries, 
gilt and parcel-gilt pieces were often favored. Thomas Chippendale 
employed parcel gilding and even commented favorably on the appear- 
ance of wholly gilt furniture. Furniture of Adam design, frequently 
executed by the second Thomas Chippendale, was often entirely gilt 
and adorned such proud dwellings as Harewood House and Syon 
House. The brothers wrote of the drawing room of No. 26 Gros- 
venor Square: "The ornaments of the ceiling and entablature are 
chiefly of stucco gilt, with a mixture of paintings. The grounds are 
coloured with various tints. The frames for glasses, the pedestals 
and the vases in the niches, and the girandoles on the piers, are of 
wood gilt." 

Gilt bronze mounts, for architectural decoration and for furni- 
ture, attained great refinement in the hands of French designers and 
craftsmen. At the beginning of the eighteenth century, at Versailles, 
an endless concern was shown and an almost endless expenditure of 
money was devoted to providing the Salon de la Guerre and the Salon 
de la Paix with the handsome gilt bronze trophies by Ladoireau that 
still compel admiration. Gilt bronze furniture mounts were widely 
employed well into the nineteenth century (numbers 117, 118). 
Among other attainments, Gouthiere is known especially for the 
excellence of his mounts for Louis XVI decorative pieces. Use of 
gold on twentieth century furniture is sparing and rare except in its 
reproductions of earlier styles. Gold is, however, by no means for- 

8 



gotten and is often used in upholstery, draperies, and accessories of 
many kinds. 

Lacquer was introduced into England during the seventeenth 
century, supposedly by Charles II, and gained immediate popularity. 
Thereafter individual pieces were often sent to the Orient for a 
decoration in which the use of gold played an important and striking 
part. 

In France, a notable development was that of vernis Martin, a 
translucent lacquer of great brilliance which was used extensively 
in the decoration of furniture, carriages, sedan chairs, and small 
objects of many sorts (number 98). A product of the skill of the 
four Martin brothers, their lacquer reached the height of its per- 
fection shortly before the middle years of the eighteenth century. 
Though they imitated all sorts of Oriental lacquer, their craft is 
shown most highly developed in the vernis Martin having a green 
ground speckled with gold. 

Furniture lacquered primarily in chinoiseries continued in favor 
for at least a century and underwent many domestic variations in- 
cluding a number of late and not entirely happy ones during the 
nineteenth century. Small oriental pieces of the greatest refinement 
always found favor, bowls, boxes, and trays being popular adjuncts 
in the decoration of many decades. 

Gilding was a usual thing on many pieces of tole, or painted sheet 
iron, which was developed to supply a relatively cheap substitute for 
the expensive imported oriental lacquer pieces. Here, too, the taste 
for chinoiserie was widely expressed (number 124), though pieces of 
the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century classic revivals (num- 
ber 115) reflect the discipline and order of their prototypes. 

The process of gilding on metal seems to have been used almost 
generally where metalworking of any refinement was practiced. 
The Egyptians were familiar with metal gilding, and the gilt and 
parcel-gilt silver of the Romans has survived in many important 
finds. Portions of the Hildesheim treasure (first century A. D.) 
are parcel-gilt and would seem to represent fairly the elaborate 

9 



Roman pieces of their time (number 103). Examples of gilt metal 
are found in every succeeding period. The centuries comprising 
the Middle Ages are particularly rich in gilt copper and bronze 
objects (figures 2 and 3) . Medieval crosses, croziers, reliquaries, and 
effigies (numbers 147, 186) were usually wholly or partially gilt, 
giving them the greatest magnificence through the harmonious con- 
junction of gold with enamel, crystal and set-stone elements. The 
accomplishment of such enrichment was not without its dangers as 
the process involved the vaporization of mercury, which at times 
caused workmen to lose their teeth and suffer other inconvenience. 

If dangerous, the process of fire-gilding seems at least fairly 
simple. An amalgam of gold and mercury is applied to the surface 
to be gilded. When the piece is heated to the correct temperature, 
the mercury passes off as a vapor, leaving a deposit of metallic gold. 
This may be burnished with an agate or a bloodstone though orig- 
inally a dog's or wolf's tooth was used for the purpose. 

Silver-, bronze-, and copper-gilt continued in importance during 
the Renaissance, acquiring the refinements along with the vitality 
of this assertive period. In England, silver-gilt almost entirely re- 
placed plain silver during the reign of the Tudors. The extended 
use of fire-gilt bronze for secular as well as religious objects is re- 
flected as early as the sixteenth century in the production of great 
numbers of small decorative things which were made in larger and 
larger quantity and variety almost through the nineteenth century. 
Furniture mounts in gilt bronze had attained great perfection in the 
preceding century along with candlesticks, writing equipment, and a 
host of minor things of similar nature and importance which in 
making their own stylistic comment give a fuller knowledge of the 
grander productions of their periods. Though today the use of gilt 
metals is more restricted, fine pieces in silver and in lesser metals 
still avail themselves of the quality of surface and the richness 
peculiar to gilding. 

Of all the metals contrived to simulate gold, perhaps pinchbeck 
has been the most favored. Hit upon early in the eighteenth century 

10 



by a London watchmaker named Christopher Pinchbeck, it is an 
alloy of copper and zinc, contaning twelve to fifteen percent of zinc. 
For over a century following its first appearance it was used ex- 
tensively in the production of such objects as watch cases, snuff 
boxes, chatelaines, etuis, thimble cases, and inexpensive jewelry 
(number 92). "Similor" or "Goldshine" imitating pinchbeck in 
France was produced by Rentz of Lille and improved by Leblanc of 
Paris during the second quarter of the eighteenth century. 

As leather, through its toughness and flexibility, early recom- 
mended itself for many uses, so gilding, because of its effectiveness 
and its ease of application, soon lent itself to the decoration of leather 
objects. John Garland (about 1192-1272) in his Dictionarius men- 
tions Cordovan leather as having been made in the eleventh century, 
though its first appearance is almost certainly earlier than this. It 
subsequently became widely noted for its gilding. Later, the gilt- 
leather craft was developed throughout western Europe to supply 
the considerable demand for wall-hangings, door-covers, and screens 
(number 102). Leather of this sort was used in a manor house 
that Henry VIII built about 1531 for Anne Boleyn. Some designs 
for these hangings were produced by artists of the first rank; gilt- 
leather at Hinchinbrock bears the name, even, of Titian. The craft 
was developed to its highest point in England and Venice in the 
beginning of the eighteenth century ; but changing taste soon largely 
restricted its use to upholstery. 

In 1766 Jean Michel Papillon wrote, in speaking of wall papers, 
of " . . . gold and silver papers with flowers and ornaments, whose 
date of invention is not far removed. These papers are being made in 
Frankfort, in Worms, and other German cities." 

During the last decades of the eighteenth century wallpaper 
panels were imported in great numbers from China and contempor- 
ary French bills indicate that these were at times decorated in gold. 
English records of about the same period mentioned gilt mouldings 
for use with wallpaper; bills for the decoration of David Garrick's 
house offer but one example. Gold seems to have been used in some 

11 



degree on the papers of each succeeding decade but was especially 
popular in the last years of the nineteenth century (number 249) . Its 
use became so general then that gold was almost invariably offered 
in the choices of color for all good papers. In modern papers gold 
substitutes are still used freely as an important element in the great 
variety of their designs. 

Embroidery with metallic threads is noted by many early writers. 
Pliny observed that gold-embroidered robes were called attalicae 
after Attains II, King of Pergamum (159-138 B. C), and earlier 
Greek examples of the fourth century B. C. are known which are 
elegantly worked in gold. The use of gold and silver threads in 
embroidery appears to have always been in favor. The "dalmatic of 
Charlemagne" (about 800 A. D.), now in the Sacristy of Saint 
Peter's in Rome, is heavily embroidered with gold and some silver. 
Sicilian coronation robes of the twelfth century bore elaborate em- 
broidered metallic ornament; one from Palermo dating about 1130 
A. D. is decorated with a date palm and two lions attacking camels. 

Gold-embroidered costume pieces of this period were not all 
so elaborate however; the Egypto-Arabic cap (number 53) of the 
twelfth or thirteenth century with its applied gold is relatively simple 
and straightforward. Such intimate reminders of individual habit 
in those distant centuries are rare, but they remove from the phrase, 
"taste for glitter," something of the abstractness it is likely to have 
when applied to people so far removed from us. 

English embroidery of the thirteenth century, called then opus 
anglicanum, was highly valued throughout the Continent and made 
extensive use of both gold and silver threads. Later embroidery 
from this country is even more elaborate. Embroidered pieces of 
the Renaissance in Italy and in other countries are often heavily en- 
riched with gold thread (number 168). Paintings in this as in 
later periods give rich evidence of the magnificence of the embroi- 
deries and textiles in use. Madame de Sevigne in describing a gift 
of M. de Langlee to Madame de Montespan tells of a dress : ". . . of 
gold upon gold, wrought over with gold, with hems of gold, 

12 




Fig. 1 — Statuette, a seated woman ; bronze, parcel-gilt 
Hittite, about 1500-1300 B. C. 
Lent by the Brooklyn Aluseum 





Fig. 2 — Plaquette; copper-gilt 

Spain, 12th or 13th century 

Lent by the Walters Art Gallery 






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and then over it a curling additional work of one gold mixed with 
another certain gold . . ." While Madame de Sevigne did not perhaps 
admire this particular garment she at least illuminates one point in 
the fashion of her day. 

A letter of about 1708 written by the Duchess of Marlborough 
closely defines the quality of the "guilt" galloon she wanted for the 
bed furnishings of Blenheim ; gold trimmings were in great vogue in 
the elaborate dwellings of that period (numbers 60, 62). While the 
eighteenth century gave a lighter touch to its enrichments, the em- 
broideries shown from within its range will indicate that em- 
broidery with gold was fashionable always and was used with great 
skill. 

Recent work in embroidery has found rich use for metallic 
threads (number 172). The interest of contemporary embroidered 
design is frequently supported and enhanced by knowing use of a 
material as old as the craft itself. 

Textiles have glittered quite as much as embroideries for, like 
embroideries, they have frequently been formed into articles of per- 
sonal raiment, reflecting directly the taste of the wearer as well as 
the general fashion of his time. Democritus of Ephesus (about 460 
— about 360 B. C.) has described the shawls, the so-called actae, worn 
in Greece. The most valued were from Persia and are described as 
finely woven materials sown with gold tinsel. Rare examples of 
Egyptian Coptic weaving are known which employ gold thread while 
later medieval fabrics used gold threads much more extensively. 
At Palermo in Sicily in the twelfth century the tiras were noted for 
their gold enrichments. Hispano-Saracenic silks of the thirteenth 
century such as those used in the robe of Don Felipe, brother of King 
Alfonso X (number 208), and Hispano-Moresque textiles of the two 
succeeding centuries found a rich use for gold among their geometric 
starred patterns. One example on view (number 210) is a fragment 
from the set of vestments from the Cathedral of Lerida. Aside from 
its many other merits it affords us a glance at the use in weaving of 
"Cyprian gold," or beaten gold on vellum wrapped around a silk 

13 



or linen core. This is again found in numbers 207 and 209. 
Romanesque silk stuffs from Regensburg used gold weft threads 
for the figures (number 215). The Chinese exported textiles woven 
with narrow strips of gilt leather to Islamic countries in the thir- 
teenth and fourteenth centuries. One bears the inscription : "Honor 
our Lord the Sultan, the King, the Righteous, the Wise Nazir Eddin" 
(1283-1304). The notable fifteenth century Ming tapestries (num- 
bers 203, 204 and figure 10) were woven for domestic use and 
enjoyment as elements of costume. 

Lucca was the earliest center in Italy to become noted for the 
richness of its weaving. The elaborate brocades produced there and 
at other Italian centres in the fourteenth century often owe much of 
their effectiveness to the use of metallic threads (numbers 213, 214). 
In the fifteenth century, the Florentine, Benedetto Dei, remarks on 
the great quantities of ". . . cloths of silk and gold and silver stuffs 
. . ." made in his city. It was not unusual there for outstanding 
artists to design textiles. Pollajuolo is thought to have designed a 
cloth of gold bearing the arms of King Matthias Corvinus of 
Hungary (1458-1490). Venice (number 206) and Genoa must be 
mentioned as producing cloths of great brilliance. Both great trad- 
ing centers, their taste was directed in part by the magnificence of 
examples coming from the East. Elaborate cloths of gold and gold 
brocades were made in the sixteenth century in both Italy and 
Cologne. 

Use of metal threads in weaving was perhaps more restricted 
in the seventeenth century; but Italian satins of these decades 
were often brocaded in gold and color (number 225). In the suc- 
ceeding century France surpassed Italy in the reputation of its 
stuffs and was responsible for the development of many designs 
of great delicacy in its brocades (number 46 and figure 11). Madame 
du Barry is credited with the introduction of the graceful flower 
patterns relieved with interweavings of gold and silver. 

Exceptionally brilliant examples of weaving with metallic 
threads are found in Polish and Russian work of the eighteenth 

14 



century. The sash, an important item of the Polish national costume, 
was often lavishly embellished with gold and silver thread. The ex- 
ample here shown (number 218 and figure 12), from, the fourth 
quarter of the century, bears on each corner a representation of the 
Paschal Lamb, symbol in this case of Paschalis, director of the factory 
of Kobytka. Even more sumptuous is the Russian brocade (num- 
ber 219) of about the same time, brocaded entirely in gold and silver. 
In both these examples the love of display has allowed no compromise 
in the lavishness of design and material. 

The geometrically designed patterns of the classical revival at 
the beginning of the nineteenth century made frequent, though 
strictly disciplined, display of gold weaving. The length (number 
217) woven in 1805 for Napoleon I for the palace of St. Cloud, is 
characteristic of Napoleonic stuffs of the classical revival. 

For some years past there has been a conspicuous revival in the 
use of metallic threads in weaving (number 247). Drapery and 
upholstery fabrics as well as textiles for costume frequently are em- 
bellished with gold or silver. A number of new materials for use 
in weaving have appeared, and among these are such developments 
as new plastic filaments, and aluminum strips encased in plastic 
acetate, both of which have the brilliance and sheen of metal as well 
as certain other physical and chemical qualities which often make 
their use desirable. Metal threads and their substitutes are being 
used to complement the new trends in design and weaving ; the present 
interest in texture is at least as great as that in pattern, and metallic 
elements serve well to emphasize a richness of texture of which glitter 
becomes a vital part. Stripes, plaids, and less usual contemporary 
designs exploit the possibilities of glitter in strikingly new and orig- 
inal ways (numbers 228, 239). 

The categories of objects mentioned above are perhaps the most 
important, in the decorative arts, which have been treated with 
metallic surfaces. But other crafts and arts have accompanied them 
and are illustrated by a few objects in the exhibition. Books, illumi- 
nation, the elements of costume — these and many other objects have 

15 



been touched and transmuted by the alchemy of man's love for 
splendor. 

The Museum's exhibition offers but a brief survey of the history 
of glitter to the present day. What new treatments and techniques 
v^ill appear to assist the course of our subject in its future develop- 
ment cannot be foretold. But it is not presumptuous to believe that 
the shining track which has so far proceeded unbroken will continue 
to brighten the surroundings and enrich the lives of the generations 
to come. 

James I. Rambo 



16 



CATALOGUE 



(The numbers set in parentheses after the descriptions of the objects 
refer to the owners of the objects, as shown in the list of Lenders to 
the Exhibition printed on pages 21 and 22.) 



CERAMICS 

1. Gallipot; porcelain, glazed and gilt; 
China, K'ang Hsi (1662-1722) (9) 

2. Vegetable dish and cover ; porcelain, 
glazed and gilt ; China, late 18th cen- 
tury (9) 

3. Ashtray ; earthenware, glazed and gilt ; 
by Ernest Moore; United States, 20th 
century (2) 

4. Bowl ; earthenware, glazed and gilt ; 
by Beatrice Wood; United States, 20th 
century (2) 

5. Cup and saucer ; porcelain, enamelled 
and gilt; Russia, about 190O (9) 

6. Cup and saucer ; porcelain, glazed and 
gilt ; Germany, Meissen, about 1850 
(9) 

7. Cup and saucer ; porcelain, enamelled 
and gilt; France, Sevres, 1846 (9) 

8. Cup and saucer ; porcelain, enamelled 
and gilt; France, Sevres, 1802 (9) 

9. Cup and saucer ; porcelain, glazed and 
gilt ; Germany, Meissen, 1726-30 (9) 

10. Chocolate pot ; porcelain, glazed and 
gilt; Germany, Meissen, 1726-30' (9) 

11. Plate; porcelain, glazed, lustred, and 
gilt; Austria, Vienna, 1791 (15) 

12. Bowl; porcelain; enamelled and gilt: 
Japan, Kutani, late 18th century (20) 

13. Bowl ; porcelain, enamelled and gilt ; 
Japan, Imari, about 1700 (20) 

14. Neck of a vase ; earthenware, glazed 
and lustred ; Hispano-Moresque ; Spain, 
12th or 13th century (21) 

15. Dish; earthenware, glazed, lustred, and 
painted ; by Maestro Giorgio da Gub- 
bio; Italy, Gubbio, about 1520 (21) 

16. Teapot, sugar bowl, and cream jug; 
porcelain, glazed and gilt ; manufactured 
for Frederik Lunning Inc. ; United 
States, 20th century (23) 

17. Coffee pot; porcelain, glazed and gilt; 
Royal Copenhagen ; Denmark, Copen- 
hagen, 20th century (23) 

18. Ash tray; porcelain, glazed and gilt; 
Royal Copenhagen ; Denmark, Copen- 
hagen, 20th century (23) 

19. Covered jar; porcelain, glazed and gilt; 
Royal Copenhagen ; Denmark, Copen- 
hagen, 20th century (23) 



20. Ewer, earthenware, glazed and lustred; 
Hispano-Moresque; Spain, early 16th 
century (26) 

21. Plate; earthenware, glazed and lustred; 
Hispano-Moresque ; Spain, 16th century 
(26) 

22. Plate ; earthenware, glazed and lustred ; 
Hispano-Moresque ; Spain, 16th century 
(26) 

23. Plate; porcelain, glazed and gilt; 
Lenox Inc. ; United States, 20th century 
(28) 

24. Cup and saucer ; porcelain, glazed and 
gilt ; Lenox Inc. ; United States, 20th 
century (28) 

25. Bottom of a bowl ; earthenware, glazed 
and lustred; Syria, Fustat, 11th or 12th 
century (30) 

26. Wall tile; earthenware, glazed and 
lustred; Persia, 13th century (30) 

27. Bowl ; earthenware, glazed and lustred ; 
England, early 19th century (30) 

28. Cup and saucer ; porcelain, enamelled 
and gilt ; Germany, Meissen, mid-18th 
century (30) 

29. Wall plaque ; earthenware, glazed and 
lustred ; Italy, Gubbio, about 1535 (30) 

30. Cup and saucer; porcelain, glazed and 
gilt; by J. H. Stouffer Company; 
United States, 20th century (42) 

31. Bowl; porcelain, glazed and gilt; Ger- 
many, Nymphenburg, about 1760 (44) 

Z2. Two small amphorae ; earthenware, 
gilt; Greece, Hellenistic period (46) 

ZZ. Wall tile; glazed and cold-gift; Persia, 
12th century (46) 

34. Bowl ; earthenware, glazed and lus- 
tred; Persia, Rayy, about 1200 (46) 

35. Tankard ; red stoneware mounted in 
gilt copper ; by Johann Friedrich 
Bottger (1682-1719) ; Germany, Meis- 
sen, about 1715 (9) 

36. Cup and saucer ; porcelain ; enamelled 
and gilt; Germany, Meissen, about 
1740 (9) 

2)7. Bowl ; porcelain, enamelled and gilt ; 

China, late 18th century (29) 
38. Plate ; glazed and gilt ; made by Havi- 

land and Company ; France, Limoges, 

late 19th century (3) 

17 



COSTUME AND 
ACCESSORIES 



39. Pair of gloves ; leather, gilt ; United 
States, 20th century (6) 

40. Fan; wood, silk, painted and gilt; 
United States, about 1900 (9) 

41. Fan; horn, metal, silk, painted and gilt; 
France, about 1815 (9) 

42. Fan; ivory and skin, painted and gilt; 
France, about 1760 (9) 

43. Rebozo ; silk and metal ; Mexico, Tlaco- 
talpan, Rio Alvarado, late 18th century 
(9) 

44. Pair of gloves ; leather, silk, metal ; 
Italy, early 17th century (9) 

45. Tassel ; silk and metal ; France, 18th 
century (17) 

46. Waistcoat ; brocaded silk and metal ; 
France, third quarter of the 18th cen- 
tury (17) _ 

47. Waistcoat; silk and metal embroidered 
with metal and brilliants ; France, late 
18th century (17) 

48. Pair of tassels ; silk, metal, and bril- 
liants ; France, 18th century (17) 

49. Waistcoat ; brocaded silk and metal ; 
France, early 18th century (17) _ 

50. Stomacher ; silk embroidered with silk 
and metal ; France, mid-18th century 

(19) 

51. Apparel ; embroidered with silk and 
metal; Italy, 16th century (19) 

52. Ohi; brocaded silk and metal ; Japan, 
late 18th century (20) 

53. Cap; silk printed and embroidered in 
gold, linen ; Egypto-Arabic, 12th or 
13th century (9) 

54. Cape ; brocaded silk and metal ; France, 
third quarter of the 18th century (9) _ 

55. Mask for a mummy case ; textile, 
gessoed and gilt ; Egypt, 25th or 26th 
dynasty, 8th to 7th century B. C. (9) 

56. Set of military buttons ; brass, gilt ; 
United States, 20th century (3) 

57. Costume ornament; openwork dragon; 
bronze, gilt ; China, early Han dynasty 
(210 B. C.-206 A. D.) (29) 

FURNITURE AND 
DECORATION 

58. Pair of carvings ; wood, lacquered ; 
Japan, 17th or 18th century (9) 

59. Frieze; wood, gessoed, painted, and 
gilt; France, about 1780 (9) 

60. Tassel ; silk, metal, and linen ; France, 
18th century (9) 

61. Galloon ; silk, metal, paillettes ; Spain, 
mid-18th century (9) 

62. Galloon ; silk and metal ; Italy, 18th 
century (9) 

63. Galloon ; silk and metal ; Spain, 17th 
century (9) 

18 



COSTUME 64. Tassel; silk and metal; Spain, 17th 
century (9) 

65. Gimp ; silk and metal ; Spain, 16th cen- 
tury (9) 

66. Gimp ; silk and metal ; Spain, 15th or 
16th century (9) 

67. Table ; marble, wood, gessoed and gilt ; 
France, about 1725 (9) 

68. Cabinet ; wood, gessoed, painted and 
gilt; Italy, 16th century (9) 

69. Pair of columns ; wood, gessoed, gilt, 
and polychromed ; Spain, 17th century 

(9). 

70. Miniature chest ; wood, gilt, with decou- 
page; possibly Italy, mid-18th century 
(22) 

71. Table-lamp; enamel on copper; by Oli; 
United States, 20th century (23) 

72. Two fragments of tracery ; wood, ges- 
soed and gilt; France, 15th century 
(30) 

73. Fruit bowl ; impregnated plastic and 
metallic thread ; by Zahara Schatz ; 
United States, 20th century (27) 



GLASS 



74. 
75. 
76. 
77. 
78. 
79. 

80. 
81. 

82. 

83. 
84. 
85. 



87. 



Jug ; blown aventurine glass ; Italy, 
Murano, late 19th century (9) 
Fragment ; glass, gilt ; Egypt, 18th 
dynasty (about 1400 B. C.) (7) _ 
Vase; glass, gilt; Bohemia, mid-19th 
century (9) 

Doorknob ; glass, interior gilt ; France 
(?), late 19th century (12) 
Flagon ; glass, gilt ; France, 18th cen- 
tury (22) 

Atomizer ; glass, crackled and gilt ; de 
Vilbiss ; United States, 20th century 
(23) 

Vase ; glass, lustred ; J. and L. Lob- 
meyr; Austria, 20th century (23) 
Fragment of a bottle ; glass, metallic 
inclusions ; Egypto - Arabic, Fatimid, 
10th or 11th century (30) 
Tesserae ; glass with encased gold leaf ; 
Hagia Sophia, Constantinople, 10th to 
15th century; and San Marco, Venice, 
date uncertain (30) 

Beaker; blue glass, gilt; Syria, 13th 
century (30) 

Scent bottle; glass, gilt; Bohemia, 
about 1850 (30) 

Pair of silhouettes ; verre eglomise; 
by Aug. Forberger (1762-1865); 
France, Paris, 1795 (30) 
Scent bottle with stopper; glass with 
encased gold leaf; Bohemia, about 1730 
(30) 

Bowl ; "cased" glass with gold leaf ; by 
Professor Giuseppe Scarpa - Croce ; 
Italy, Murano, 20th century (45) 
Vase ; purple glass, faceted and gilt ; 
England, probably Bristol, about 1790 
(41) 



89. Champagne glass ; glass, gilt ; Eng- 
land, about 1760 (41) 

90. Fragment of a bowl ; glass, with en- 
cased gold leaf decoration; Moses 
Striking the Rock ; Italy, Early Chris- 
tian style (36) 

JEWELRY 

91. Necklace; copper-gilt; England, mid- 
19th century (4) 

92. Fourteen examples of pinchbeck ; Eng- 
land, mid-19th century (9) 

93. Fibula; bronze, gilt; Rome, 1st century 
A. D. (30) 

94. Watch ; copper with vari-colored gild- 
ing ; movement signed ; Les Frs Wiss a 
Geneve ; Switzerland, Geneva, 1775- 
1785 (30) 

95. Watch ; silver-gilt ; movement signed : 
Tarts, London ; England, London, third 
quarter of the 18th century (30) 

96. Watch ; crystal and gilt brass ; Ger- 
many, early 17th century (30) 

LACQUER 

97. Box in three sections ; lacquer ; Japan, 
19th century (3) 

98. Etui; vernis Martin; France, mid-18th 
century (46) 

LEATHERWORK 

99. Panel, fragment of a wall covering ; 
leather, embossed, gilt, and painted; 
Flanders, about 1680 (9) 

100. Panel, fragment of a wall covering ; 
leather, embossed, painted, and gilt; 
Holland, about 1680 (9) 

101. Binding; leather, stamped and gilt; 
France, 18th century (8) 

102. Two panels ; leather, gilt ; France, 16th 
century (18) 



METALWORK 

103. Patera ; silver, parcel-gilt ; reproduc- 
tion after original, Roman, 1st century, 
found at Hildesheim (9) 

104. Sword guard ; copper alloy, gilt ; Japan, 
late 18th century (9) 

105. Sword guard ; iron, gilt ; Japan, early 
18th century (9) 

106. Sword guard; copper-gilt; Japan, early 
18th century (9) 

107. Sword guard ; copper, parcel-gilt ; 
Japan, early 15th century (9) 

108. Set of sword fittings ; iron, copper-gilt ; 
Japan, early 19th century (9) 

109. Sword guard; copper-gilt; Japan, mid- 
19th century (9) 



110. Sword guard; iron, gilt; Japan, early 
19th century (9) 

111. Sword guard; iron, gilt; Japan, early 
19th century (9) 

112. Vase; bronze, gilt; by Hector Guimard 
(1867-1942) ; France, about 1905 (9) 

113. Ewer; silver-gilt; by Joseph Angell; 
England, London, 1854-55 (9) 

1 14. Pair of candlesticks ; bronze, gilt ; 
France, about 1830 (9) 

115. Egg warmer; tole; France, about 1810 
(9) 

116. Teapot and cream jug; silver-gilt; by 
Jean Baptiste Claude Odiot (1763- 
1850) ; France, Paris, about 1815 (9) 

117. Furniture mount; bronze, gilt; France, 
about 1800 (9) 

118. Applique; bronze, gilt; France, about 
1780 (9) 

119. Pendant; bronze, gilt; France, about 
1780 (9) 

120. Pair of candlesticks; bronze, gilt; 
France, about 1780 (9) 

121. Pair of candelabra; silver-gilt; by 
Claude Ballin, the younger (1661- 
1774) ; France, Paris, second quarter 
of the 18th century (9) 

122. Snufif box ; silver-gilt, with niello ; 
Russia, third quarter of the 18th cen- 
tury (9) 

123. Covered trophy cup ; silver, parcel- 
gilt; by Abraham Drentwet (died 
1785) ; Germany, Augsburg, about 1771 
(9) 

124. Pair of jardinieres; tole; England, 
about 1765 (9) 

125. Medallion in frame; bronze, gilt; after 
a composition of Jean Baptiste Huet 
(1740-1811) ; France, about 1780 (9) 

126. Calendar holder; bronze, gilt; France, 
about 1740 (9) 

127. Applique; bronze, gilt; France, about 
1715 (9) 

128. Pair of candelsticks ; bronze, gilt ; 
France, about 1720 (9) 

129. Covered cup; copper-gilt; France, 1st 
half of the 16th century (9) 

130. Snufif box; tortoise shell and silver- 
gilt; France, early 19th century (10) 

131. Box in the form of a medal; silver- 
gilt; France, early 19th century (10) 

132. Snufif box; copper-gilt (pomponne) ; 
France, late 18th century (l7) 

133. Place setting; Dirilyte; United States, 
20th century (23) 

134. Clock; bronze (?), gold-plated; made 
by Angelus ; Switzerland, Le Locle, 
20th century (23) 

135. Ash tray ; copper, enamelled ; by L 
Puskas ; United States, 20th century 
(23) 

136. Cigarette box ; spun bronze ; by Vir- 
ginia Dunn ; United States, 20th cen- 
tury (2) 

19 



137. Pair of candlesticks; polished bronze; 
by Jean Wells; United States, 20th 
century (2) 

138. Snuff box; copper, enamelled, possibly 
Germany, 18th century (30) 

139. Snuff box; silver, parcel-gilt; probably 
by Antoine Daroux (died 1789) ; 
France, Paris, 1755-56 (30) 

140. Chalice ; silver, gilt and enamelled ; 
Spain, Madrid, early 17th century (30) 

141. Spoon; silver-gilt; probably by Leon- 
hard Rothaer ; Germany, Hamburg, 
late 17th century (30) _ 

142. Table clock ; bronze, gilt ; German, late 
16th century (30) 

143. Dish; silver, parcel-gilt; Spain (or 
Portugal), 16th century (30) 

144. Beaker; silver-gilt; by Matthaus Bair 
(1550-1626) ; Germany, Augsburg, 
about 1575-1600 (30) 

145. Plaquette ; copper-gilt ; Spain, 12th or 
13th century (46) 

146. Aquamanile; bronze, gilt; Lorraine 
(?), about 1200 (46) 

147. Reliquary; copper-gilt, with jevi?els; 

Switzerland, 14th century (46) 

148. Reliquary for suspension; copper-gilt, 
with jewels ; Austria, 14th century (46) 

149. Censer with chain; silver-gilt; Ger- 
many, 1498 (46) 

150. Snuff box; copper, repousse and gilt 
(pomponne) ; France, 18th century (46) 

151. Standing cup with cover; silver-gilt; 
by Jan Lutma, the elder (1584-1669) ; 
Holland, Amsterdam, about 1639 (46) 

152. Medallion for suspension; bronze-gilt; 
Italy, Florence, 15th century (46) 

153. Medal : silver-gilt ; by Hans Reinhart, 
the elder (died 1581) ; Germany, 16th 
century (46) 

154. Clock; bronze, gilt, and marble; made 
by Le Comte; France, Paris, about 
1775 (9) 

155. Ornament for a chariot; a split tiger; 
bronze, with gilt decoration ; China, 
middle Chou dynasty (950-650 B. C.) 
(29) 

156. Stemmed cup ; bronze, gilt ; Chma, 
T'ang dynasty (618-964 A. D.) (29) 

NEEDLEWORK AND LACE 

157. Pair of drapery panels ; silk, embroi- 
dered in silk and metal ; possibly Italy, 
style of the 18th century (3) 

158. Panel ; silk velvet, embroidered with 
beads, paillettes, and metal ; Bergdorf 
Goodman; United States, 20th century 

■ (6) _ 

159. Panel; Christ Enthroned; linen em- 
broidered with silk and metal ; Spain, 
15th century (9) 

160. Strip of lace ; silk and metal ; Austria 
(?), 19th century (9) 

20 



161. Panel; silk embroidered with silk and 
metal; France, 1838 (9) 

162. Embroiderer's sample; silk velvet em- 
broidered with silk, metal, and bril- 
liants; France, about 1790 (9) 

163. Strip ; linen net embroidered with gold 
thread ; Italy or Spain, early 17th cen- 
tury (9) 

164. Three panels of an orphrey; linen em- 
broidered with silk and metal ; Spain 
or Italy, 17th century (9) 

165. Pair of bands ; silk embroidered with 
silk and metal; Austria (?), 17th or 
18th century (17) 

166. Strip of lace; silk and metal; Italy 
(?), 17th or 18th century (17) 

167. Band; linen embroidered with silk and 
metal ; Italy or France, late 16th cen- 
tury (17) _ 

168. Pair of bands ; linen embroidered with 
silk and metal; Italy, 16th century (17) 

169. Bag ; silk embroidered with silk and 
metal; England, 17th century (19) 

170. Bag; silk embroidered with silk and 
metal; Spain, 16th century (19) 

171. Table cover; linen, with metal lace; 
Spain, 16th century (19) 

172. Panel of embroidery: "More Angels"; 
linen embroidered with silk and metal ; 
by Mariska Karasz; United States, 
20th century (24) 

PAINTING AND 

ILLUMINATION 

173. Genealogy; vellum; France, mid-16th 
century (5) 

174. Illumination; vellum; France, about 
1360 (11) 

175. Illumination; vellum; France, about 
1440 (11) 

176. Scroll painting; Amida and Attend- 
ants; silk; Japan, about 1300 (20) 

177. Manuscript; Book of Hours; vellum; 
Flanders, early 14th century (46) 

178. Illumination; St. Mark; vellum; By- 
zantium, 11th century (46) 

SCULPTURE AND 
SMALL CARVINGS 

179. Seated figure of a woman holding 
snakes ; bronze, parcel-gilt ; Hittite, 
about 1500-1300 B. C. (7) 

180. Seated figure of Bast; wood, gessoed 
and gilt; Egypt, late dynastic, 7th to 
4th century B. C. (7) 

181. Woodcarving; a warrior on horseback 
with an attendant; wood, gilt; Japan,, 
mid-18th century (9) 

182. Statuette from an altar group ; Ananda ; 
bronze, gilt ; China, about 590 (20) 

183. Mask; wax, gilt; Egypt, late dynastic- 
Ptolemaic, 7th-4th century B. C. (30) 



184. Goat; earthenware, gilt; Mycenae, late 
Helladic III, about 1500 B. C. (30) 

185. Five plaquettes ; wood, gessoed, painted, 
and gilt; Germany, 13th century (30) 

186. Statuette ; a mourning woman, bronze, 
gilt ; Mosan, 12th century (46) 

187. Two angels ; bronze, gilt ; Germany, 
17th century (46) 

188. Relief carving : The Circumcision ; 
wood, gessoed, gilt, and polychromed ; 
possibly Germany, 15th century (9) 

189. Frieze with Buddhistic figures ; wood, 
gilt; China, 14th or 15th century (29) 

190. Standing figure of a Bodhisattva; 
bronze, gilt ; China, T'ang dynasty 

(618-964 A. D.) (29) 

191. Standing figure of a Tara; bronze, gilt; 
Tibet, 17th century (29) 

TEXTILES 

192. Textile; acetate and metal; Allan Silk 
Mills; United States, 20th century (1) 

193. Place mat ; linen and metal ; by Phyllis 
Parker Spencer; United States, 20th 
century (2) 

194. Table cloth; linen and metal; by 
Marianne Homburger; United States, 
20th century (2) 

195. Place mat; cotton and metallic braid; 
by Ann Schubert; United States, 20th 
century (2) 

196. Decorative textile; cotton and metal; 
designed by Dorothy Liebes ; made by 
Goodall ; United States, 20th century 

(9) . . 

197. Decorative textile; cotton, jute, metal; 
by Anni Albers; United States, 20th 
century (9) 

198. Decorative textile ; cotton and metal ; 
by Anni Albers ; United States, 20th 
century (9) 

199. Drapery textile ; cotton and metal ; by 
Anni Albers ; United States, 20th cen- 
tury (9) 

200. Decorative textile ; cotton and metal ; 
by Dorothy Liebes ; United States, 20th 
century (9) 

201. Decorative textile; cotton and metal; 
by Dorothy Liebes ; United States, 20th 
century (9) 

202. Decorative textile ; cotton, silk, and 
metal ; by Dorothy Liebes ; United 
States, 20th century (9) 

203. Fragment of tapestry (K'o-ssii) ; silk 
and metal ; China, Ming dynasty, 15th 
century (9) 

204. Fragment of tapestry (K'o-ssu) ; silk 
and metal ; China, Ming dynasty, 15th 
century (9) 

205. Cut voided cloth velvet ; silk and metal ; 
Italy, 16th or 17th century (9) 

206. Plain compound twill ; silk and metal ; 
Italy, Venice, 15th century (9) 



207. Brocade ; silk and metal ; a fragment 
of the cope of San Valero, formerly in 
the Cathedral of Lerida; Spain, 14th 
or 15th century (9) 

208. Brocade ; silk and metal ; Hispano- 
Moresque ; from the tunic of the Infante 
Don Felipe (died 1274) ; Spain, 13th 
century (9) 

209. Brocade; silk and metal; Spain, 13th 
or 14th century (9) 

210. Brocade ; silk and metal ; a fragment 
from a set of vestments of the Cathedral 
of Lerida; Spain, 13th or 14th century 
(9) 

211. Brocade; silk and metal; England, first 
half of the 19th century (9) 

212. Brocade ; silk and metal ; Hispano- 
Moresque ; Spain, 14th century (9) 

213. Brocade; silk and metal; Italy, Lucca, 
14th century (9) 

214. Brocade ; silk and metal, Italy or Spain, 
14th century (9) 

215. Twill; silk, metal, linen; Germany, 
Regensburg, 13th century (9) 

216. Plain cloth and tapestry; silk and 
metal; Egypto-Arabic, 10th to 12th 
century (9) 

217. Brocade; silk and metal; France, 
Lyons, about 1805 (9) 

218. Girdle or sash ; brocade, silk and 
metal ; factory of Kobytka ; Poland, late 
18th century (9) 

219. Brocade; silk and metal; Russia, late 
18th century (9) 

220. Cut voided satin velvet ; silk and metal ; 
Italy or Spain, 16th century (9) 

221. Brocade ; silk and metal ; Italy, Venice, 
about 1700 (9) 

222. Satin ; silk and metal ; Broussa, Turkey, 
16th century (9) 

223. Brocade ; silk and metal ; Mesopotamia 
(?), 8th or 9th century (9) 

224. Brocade ; silk and metal ; France, late 
19th century (9) 

225. Brocade; silk and metal; Italy, 17th 
century (9) 

226. Cut voided velvet ; silk and metal ; 
Spain or Italy, 15th century (9) 

227. Rug; "Stardust"; wool, Lurex, latex; 
by Joseph Blumfield; United States, 
20th century (13) 

228. Costume textile ; cotton and Lurex ; 
by Galey and Lord Inc. ; United States, 
20th century (14) 

229. Decorative textile ; cotton and metal ; 
by Greeff Fabrics Inc. ; United States, 
20th century (16) 

230. Brocade ; silk and metal ; India, Ben- 
ares, 20th century (23) 

231. Decorative textile: "Meditation"; print 
on silk and metal ; by Estelle and 
Erwine Laverne; United States, 20th 
century {27) 

21 



232. Upholstery textile ; wool, Lurex ; de- 
signed by Lyda Weyl ; made by Marie 
Nichols Fabrics; United States, 20th 
century (31) 

233. Decorative textile; cotton, wool, 
Lurex ; designed by Gloria Wasser- 
man ; made by Marie Nichols Fabrics ; 
United States, 20th century (31) 

234. Decorative textile : "South Seas" ; cot- 
ton, metal overprint ; by Patterson Fab- 
rics, Inc. ; United States, 20th century 

(34) 

235. Decorative textile ; silk and metal ; by 
I SPA; Italy, Torino, 20th century (35) 

236. Decorative textile ; silk and metal ; by 
Scalamandre ; United States, 20th cen- 
tury (38) 

237. Decorative textile ; cotton and metal ; 
by Scalamandre ; United States, 20th 
century (38) 

238. Decorative textile ; Lurex and cotton ; 
by F. Schumacher and Co. ; United 
States, 20th century (39) 

239. Decorative textile ; gold and silver 
Metlon yarn; by Isabel Scott; United 
States, 20th century (40) 

240. Decorative textile ; silk, cotton, and 
metal ; by Stroheim and Romann ; 
United States, 20th century (43) 

241. Decorative textile ; silk, cotton, and 
metal ; by Stroheim and Romann ; 
United States, 20th century (43) 

242. Decorative gauze ; silk and metal ; by 
Stroheim and Romann ; United States, 
20th century (43) 



243. Decorative chintz; cotton and metal 
overprint; by Stroheim and Romann; 
United States, 20th century (43) 

244. Tapestry panel : "Angel" ; metallic and 
other yarns ; by Marta Taipale ; Fin- 
land, 20th century (37) 

245. Decorative textile ; Lurex and cotton ; 
by Original Textile Company; United 
States, 20th century (32) 

246. Decorative textile ; Lurex and cotton ; 
by Original Textile Company; United 
States, 20th century (32) 

247. Decorative textile ; mercerized cotton 
and metal ; England, 1937. Woven for 
hanging in Westminster Abbey at the 
Coronation of King George VI and 
Queen Elizabeth (9) 

WALL-PAPER 

248. Wall-paper frieze ; paper ; France, 
about 1815 (9) 

249. Fragment of wall-paper ; paper, em- 
bossed; United States, 1880-1890 (9) 

250. Fragment of wall-paper : "Valley 
Woods" ; paper ; by Katzenbach and 
Warren Inc. ; United States, 20th cen- 
tury (25) 

251. Fragment of wall-paper: "Tea Chest"; 
paper ; by Laverne Originals ; United 
States, 20th century (27) 

252. Fragment of wall-paper : "Broken 
Blocks" ; paper ; by Wilton E. Owen, 
Inc. ; United States, 20th century (33) 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT 



In assembling material for the exhibition, the Museum has received 
most helpful suggestions and information from the following: Mr. 
A. L. Barney, Mrs. May Girard, Miss Doris Keebler, Mr. George 
Kramer, Mr. Marvin C. Ross, and Mr. Herbert Weissberger. To 
them, and to the many generous lenders enumerated here, are given 
most grateful thanks. 



22 



LENDERS TO THE EXHIBITION 

ALLAN SILK MILLS (1) 

AMERICA HOUSE (2) 

ANONYMOUS (3) 

MISS ALICE B. BEER (4) 

PIERRE BERES INC. (5) 

BERGDORF GOODMAN (6) 

THE BROOKLYN MUSEUM (7) 

THE COOPER UNION MUSEUM LIBRARY (8) 

THE COOPER UNION MUSEUM (9) 

HENRY HARRISON DE PRISE (10) 

PHILIP C. DUSCHNES (11) 

ELISHA DYER (12) 

EDWARD FIELD, INC. (13) 

GALEY AND LORD INCORPORATED (14) 

M. GLUCKSELIG & SON (15) 

GREEFF FABRICS INC. (16) 

RICHARD C. GREENLEAF (17) 

MRS. WILLIAM GREENOUGH (18) 

MISS MARIAN HAGUE (19) 

HAROLD G. HENDERSON (20) 

DR. JACOB HIRSCH (21) 

JOSEPHINE HOWELL (22) 

GEORG JENSEN INC. (23) 

MARISKA KARASZ (24) 

KATZENBACH AND WARREN, INC. (25) 

DIKRAN G. KELEKIAN, INCORPORATED (26) 

LA VERNE ORIGINALS (27) 

LENOX INC. (28) 

C. T. LOO, INC. (29) 

THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART (30) 



23 



MARIE NICHOLS, FABRICS (31) 

ORIGINAL TEXTILE COMPANY (32) 

WILTON E. OWEN, INC. (33) 

PATTERSON FABRICS, INC. (34) 

GUIDO PERERA (35) 

THE ART MUSEUM, PRINCETON UNIVERSITY (36) 

MRS. MARGARET NELSON SANDFORT (37) 

SCALAMANDRE SILKS (38) 

F. SCHUMACHER AND CO. (39) 

ISABEL SCOTT FABRICS, INC. (40) 

STEUBEN GLASS (41) 

J. H. STOUFFER CO. (42) 

STROHEIM AND ROMANN (43) 

IRWIN UNTERMYER (44) 

A. J. VAN DUGTEREN & SONS, INC. (45) 

THE WALTERS ART GALLERY (46) 



The numbers set in parentheses after the names of the lenders are used 
in the body of the Catalogue to identify ownership of individual objects. 



24 




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